Anger Management On Your Own

I can’t remember the last time that I was enraged… prior to this week. Strangely, I now feel fortunate to have recently experienced fury once again. Fortunate? Yes, fortunate and blessed, because I was able to see how using the CalmUp® Journey works when it comes to anger management.

I wrote about stress management tips in my last blog, and I never anticipated raising the ante to anger management in my writing. However, as stated on my home page, “CalmUp® helps transform you into the person you aspire to be—for yourself, for others, for the world.” I believe that if the situations I experience help you grow as I grow, I must be doing what I need to be doing.

The first thing I discovered during my period of fury was that taking a CalmUp® Journey was the last thing I wanted to do. In fact, I avoided any introspection for a good 24 hours. I didn’t want to look at myself; I wanted to blame. Come to think of it, in some sick kind of way, I enjoyed the feeling of anger and wasn’t ready to let it go.

Feeling Anxious and Wanna Shake It?

You complete your CalmUp® Journey, and your rating of peace and joy doubles from a “4” to an “8” on the 1–10 scale. Then on your way to the office, someone dangerously cuts you off in traffic, and your morning is now anything but calm. Your car is fine, and you’re fine. You just can’t shake the anxiety that seems to have taken hold of you.

What do you do? You have to get to work, and you don’t want to go in carrying the morning’s tension. No matter how much you tell yourself to stop being ridiculous, darker thoughts keep creeping in:

  • That bleep driver!
  • What if I’d have been hit?
  • So much for moving up to an “8.” Now I’m more like a “2.”
  • What if something were to happen to me, and I’m not there for my family?”
  • I’m so mad!

It’s strange how your day can change in an instant. A careless driver is just one example of the type of occurrence that has the power to shift your mood from radiant to fatalistic. Even simple events can become upsetting or disrupting, like a clothing tear or a spill, a bad hair day or a blemish, something that gets broken or destroyed. More serious events can leave you feeling anxious or heartbroken, such as the death of a loved one, learning of a terminal illness, or an unexpected disaster.

Lighten Up!

I noticed the other day that one of my mentors wrote a newsletter this month with the same title. Is this a coincidence? I considered coming up with a new topic and title. Wait, I told myself, maybe it’s an important enough message to be told in more than one way.

I got the idea to write about the topic after my husband heard my last interview of “Regular Folks With a Noteworthy Story” and told me that I sounded too serious and needed to “lighten up.” My interpretation is that I need to laugh more, I could use more fun in my life, and I ought to mellow out. Yes, I had to admit that “lighten up” was good advice.

How can I lighten up?

Here comes full disclosure… On more than one occasion, even prior to my husband’s recommendation, I’ve questioned on the CalmUp® Journey how I could lighten up a bit. Here are a handful of suggestions I’ve integrated:

•    Schedule fun first
•    Spend more time in the hot tub
•    Take more naps
•    Bake
•    When your kid asks you to go sledding, say yes

Thanksgiving 2011

I’ve wanted to write a blog to capture some of my feelings of gratitude this Thanksgiving of 2011. Where do I start? How about my CalmUp® Journey question from this morning?

How can I write a meaningful “Thank You” blog?

I began to question if I’m thankful for just the “good stuff” or if I’m honestly thankful for the “yucky stuff” too. I teach acceptance of both the dark side and the light side in the Daily Ascending Tool™. Am I really thankful for the chaos I experienced during the publishing process? Am I really thankful for the challenges and the financial pressures that are part of a new business launch?

On this Thanksgiving holiday, it’s easy to be thankful for the “good stuff” related to the launching of CalmUp®. I’m thankful for the comments that people are posting on the website (www.Dr.LorieGose.com). I’m thankful for the emails I’m receiving offering congratulations. I’m thankful for my connections with people. These are, of course, just three of a much larger list of reasons I have for giving thanks.